Online Educational Units in Asian Art

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Resources Organized by Time Period: 1450-1750



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Asian Influences on European Art
Getty Museum
Explore with your class Asian influences on European art in the 18th century in this lesson plan. Discover ways to engage your students in the investigation of chinoiserie, the cultural and artistic trend that produced objects and paintings reflecting Chinese subjects and motifs. In its broadest sense, chinoiserie was meant to evoke the spirit and decorative forms of faraway lands as diverse as China, Japan, India, and the Middle East.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/classroom_resources/curricula/asian_inf...
The Astor Chinese Garden Court
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
A replica of a Ming dynasty home garden from Suzhou, China, recreated by artisans from China. The design of the museum's Chinese garden is "based on a small courtyard within a scholar's garden in the city of Suzhou, China, called Wang Shi Yuan, the Garden of the Master of the Fishing Nets.The first permanent cultural exchange between the U.S. and the People's Republic of China, the installation was completed in 1981. Conceived by museum trustee Brooke Astor, the courtyard was created and assembled by expert craftsmen from China using traditional methods, materials and hand tools." See photo gallery as well as lesson plan.

Go to Museum Resource: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/78870
Ch'ing (Qing), 1644-1912
Minneapolis Institute of Arts
"The last Chinese dynasty began on a positive note -- of energetic collecting, cataloging, and exporting -- but ended disastrously." A brief, one-paragraph overview, along with a map, a video clip featuring an MIA curator, and 445 objects from the period.

Go to Museum Resource: http://archive.artsmia.org/art-of-asia/history/dynasty-ching.cfm
China on Paper: European and Chinese Works from the Late Sixteenth to the Early Nineteenth Century
Getty Museum
Online presentation of a 2007-08 exhibition presenting "works on paper from the special collections of the Research Library at the Getty Research Institute that document the fascinating story of cultural exchanges between Chinese and Europeans in the early-modern era." With text discussing the key role that Jesuit missionaries in China played in the story of this exchange, illustrated with six works from the exhibition.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/china_paper/
China’s ‘China’: Porcelain’s Contribution to World History and Culture
China Institute
A simple and clear-cut way of demonstrating the significant impact that Chinese porcelain has had on global material culture over many centuries is to consider the very word ‘China’ in the English language: the word refers not only to the country but is also synonymous with the porcelain pottery ware that began to circulate in Europe almost as soon as European ships rounded the Cape of Good Hope and increasingly established direct trade relations with China and other Asian countries. Ceramic pottery is, of course, as old as human civilization and found around the globe; but the unique quality and properties of porcelain—its considerable strength, translucency, and high resistance to thermal shock—make it one of the great contributions Chinese civilization has made to world cultures.

Go to Museum Resource: https://china360online.org/?property=appreciation-capitals
Chinese Calligraphy
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
An overview of the development of calligraphy in China: "Calligraphy, or the art of writing, was the visual art form prized above all others in traditional China. The genres of painting and calligraphy emerged simultaneously, sharing identical tools—namely, brush and ink. Yet calligraphy was revered as a fine art long before painting; indeed, it was not until the Song dynasty, when painting became closely allied with calligraphy in aim, form, and technique, that painting shed its status as mere craft and joined the higher ranks of the fine arts. With images of 16 paintings from the Song, Ming, and Qing dynasties and two related objects.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/chcl/hd_chcl.htm
Chinese Export Porcelain at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Short introduction with images of works given as examples of the range of trade.

Go to Museum Resource: https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/ewpor/hd_ewpor.htm
Chinese Handscrolls
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
An overview of the Chinese handscroll format: "A significant difference between Eastern and Western painting lies in the format. Unlike Western paintings, which are hung on walls and continuously visible to the eye, most Chinese paintings are not meant to be on constant view but are brought out to be seen only from time to time. This occasional viewing has everything to do with format." With images of 18 paintings from the Tang, Song, Yuan, Ming, and Qing dynasties.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/chhs/hd_chhs.htm
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