Resources Organized by Time Period: 1750-1919



ALL | China | Japan | Korea | Vietnam/Southeast Asia | India/South Asia | Tibet/Himalaya | Asia General
2  3  4  5  6 Next Page Last Page
Show All 63 Results (Text Only)
Arts from the Ch'ing Imperial Collection
National Palace Museum
Featuring the following topics: 1) The Art and Function of Curio Boxes; 2) The Origins of the Collection Objects; 3) The Preservation and Collection of Artifacts; 4) The Thoughts and Actions of the Emperor.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.npm.gov.tw/exh96/imperial_collection/
The Asian Art Digital Teaching Project: China
Columbia University and The National Endowment for the Humanities
Featuring two teaching modules for learning about Chinese painting -- The Grandeur of the Qing and Exploring Chinese Painting. The first "offers a detailed visual and historical exploration of four monumental scrolls recording the imperial inspection tours of the Kangxi and Qianlong emperors in the 17th and 18th centuries"; the second is "a workspace allowing students to view and compare a group of important Chinese hand scrolls and hanging scrolls from the 10th to the 17th centuries."

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.learn.columbia.edu/nehasian/html/neh_geo_con_china.html
An Assorted Tapestry of Lustrous Beauty: Export Porcelains from the Museum Collection
National Palace Museum
"The National Palace Museum is renowned for preserving the precious collections from the imperial families through the ages. For this reason, however, porcelains made for export and circulation overseas as trade goods do not appear in significant numbers in the Museum collection. Fortunately, over the years, a steady stream of purchases and donations have led to the gradual expansion of export ceramic types in the Museum holdings, thereby increasing the breadth and depth of the collection. This special exhibition focuses on export porcelains from the ninth to nineteenth centuries and also serves to express a token of gratitude for the generosity of donors." With four topics: 1) The Diversity of Chinese Export Porcelain; 2) The Spread of Ceramics Trade; 3) Rare Curios Fired to Order; 4) Exchanges in the Art and Craft of Ceramics.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.npm.gov.tw/exh99/export/
The Boundaries of Heaven: Chinese Ink Painting in the Republican Period, 1911-1949
The University of Kansas, Spencer Museum of Art
"As with any period of transition, the Republican era (1911-1949) was one of immense change. Political instability coupled with efforts to dramatically rethink Chinese culture, producing an embattled art world in which dynamic experimentation often clashed with the stalwart defense of tradition." With a short exhibition overview and paintings by 7 artists.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.spencerart.ku.edu/exhibitions/reviving_boundries.shtml
Ch'ing (Qing), 1644-1912
Minneapolis Institute of Arts
"The last Chinese dynasty began on a positive note -- of energetic collecting, cataloging, and exporting -- but ended disastrously." A brief, one-paragraph overview, along with a map, a video clip featuring an MIA curator, and 445 objects from the period.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.artsmia.org/art-of-asia/history/dynasty-ching.cfm
China on Paper: European and Chinese Works from the Late Sixteenth to the Early Nineteenth Century
Getty Museum
Online presentation of a 2007-08 exhibition presenting "works on paper from the special collections of the Research Library at the Getty Research Institute that document the fascinating story of cultural exchanges between Chinese and Europeans in the early-modern era." With text discussing the key role that Jesuit missionaries in China played in the story of this exchange, illustrated with six works from the exhibition.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/china_paper/
Chinese Calligraphy
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
An overview of the development of calligraphy in China: "Calligraphy, or the art of writing, was the visual art form prized above all others in traditional China. The genres of painting and calligraphy emerged simultaneously, sharing identical tools—namely, brush and ink. Yet calligraphy was revered as a fine art long before painting; indeed, it was not until the Song dynasty, when painting became closely allied with calligraphy in aim, form, and technique, that painting shed its status as mere craft and joined the higher ranks of the fine arts. With images of 16 paintings from the Song, Ming, and Qing dynasties and two related objects.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/chcl/hd_chcl.htm
Chinese Export Porcelain at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Online presentation of a 2003 exhibition. "Dating from the mid-sixteenth century through the third quarter of the nineteenth century, the exhibition included a wide range of vessel types as well as services and punch bowls, and two works in ivory." With images of 10 related artworks.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.metmuseum.org/special/se_event.asp?OccurrenceId={502EE34F-5754-11D6-...
2  3  4  5  6 Next Page Last Page
Show All 63 Results (Text Only)