Featured Topic: Zoroastrianism

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Religions of the Silk Road: Zoroastrianism
University of Washington, Simpson Center for the Humanities
"Zoroastrianism, the dominant pre-Islamic religious tradition of the Iranian peoples, was founded by the prophetic reformer Zoroaster in the 6th or 7th century BCE (if not earlier). The religion survived into the 20th century in isolated areas of Iran, and is also practiced in parts of India (particularly Bombay) by descendants of Iranian immigrants known as Parsis." Brief overview of Zoroastrianism, especially its spread to China. WIth two images. Part of a larger exhibit on the art of the silk road.

Go to Museum Resource: http://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/exhibit/religion/zoroastrianism/zoroastria...
Sacred Texts: The Ashem Vohu
The British Library
This is a "9th or 10th century Sogdian manuscript from Dunhuang, China," containing "a version of one of the holiest Zoroastrian prayers: the Ashem Vohu, composed originally in the Avestan (old Iranian) language." Featuring excellent high-resolution images of the manuscript, along with background information on the Songdians, Zoroastrianism in Central Asia, and the significance of this particular manuscript.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/sacredtexts/ashem.html
Sacred Texts: The Videvdad
The British Library
This 14th-century copy of the Zoroastrian Videvdad, "a lawbook containing the rules for dealing with pollution and crime," is "one of the oldest existing Zoroastrian manuscripts, copied in 1323 in Nawsari, Gujarat, by the scribe Mihraban Kaykhusraw." Featuring excellent high-resolution images of the manuscript, along with background information on Zoroastrianism and the significance of this particular manuscript.

Go to Museum Resource: http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/sacredtexts/videvdad.html
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